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Yellow species -Sustainable guide to monitors Print E-mail

yellow100.jpg

The yellow species are almost always taken from the wild. They are sometimes bred in captivity although captive bred stock is very difficult to find. These species inhabit very large areas and there are no reasons to suppose that the wildlife trade is having a detrimental impact on their global populations because 1) numbers harvested for wildlife trade are relatively small or 2) because populations are known to be large and robust. African and Asian species tend also to be harvested for meat or leather, in much larger numbers than are taken for the pet trade. Buying these species will not have any significant effect on wild populations.

 

 

 

Varanus albigularis (all subspecies)

Varanus exanthematicus

Varanus niloticus

Varanus salvator group  (most species)

Varanus ornatus

Varanus griseus*

Varanus bengalensis*

 

* = CITES Appendix 1 species - no commercial trade allowed. 

 
 

 

About Mampam
William Oliver

William Oliver. Champion of biodiversity and its students. So many of us benefited from his advice and expertise. What a character. RIP.

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Help Mampam
The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Conservation

polillomap1.jpgThe dark green patch at center left in this unmanipulated Google Earth image is the last remaining fragment of unlogged lowland dipterocarp forest on Polillo Island, and our main study site for the last 11 years. Less than one square mile in size (220ha) and less than 100m above sea level, the Sibulan Watershed Reserve has lost much of its secondary boundary forest over the last six years through illegal and uncontrolled agricultural activities. 

Read more...
 

 

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