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Monitors
Save Your Monitor Lizards! Print E-mail

Save Your Monitors!
Monitor lizards are heavily exploited for their meat and leather and for the international wildlife trade. There have been very few investigations into the ecology and conservation status of monitor lizards, and, as far as I am aware, no funds from the trade in monitor lizards has ever been used to fund  research.


This project aims to improve this situation in the following way.
1.     People who keep monitor lizards donate their dead animals to a national Save Your Monitors  group.
2.     Members of the national group make products from the dead monitor lizards (e.g. leather goods, skeletal preparations) and sell them on ebay
3.     The profits generated are distributed as small grants to students in countries where monitor lizards live, allowing them to make basic investigations into local monitor lizard populations.

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Pet Crocodile Monitors Print E-mail
ImageThe crocodile monitor, Varanus salvadorii, is perhaps responsible for more hospital visits than any other lizard in the USA, despite the fact that only about 200 are legally imported each year. Crocodile monitors have a remarkable set of teeth that inflict deep and severe flesh wounds. The most serious result in permanent disability and almost all crocodile monitor bites leave permanent scars. Read about people's experiences with Varanus salvadorii in our review.
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The Caspian Monitor Lizard Print E-mail
The Caspian monitor lizard inhabits the KharaKhum desert of Turkmenistan. The very hot summers and very cold winters mean it can only venture above ground for a few months of the year. This makes it a very angry lizard, so watch out
 
International Varanid Interest Group Print E-mail
 The International Varanid Interest Group is a volunteer-based organization established to advance varanid research, conservation, and husbandry, and to promote scientific literacy among varanid enthusiasts worldwide. Membership to the IVIG is free, and open to anyone with an interest in monitor lizards. Click Here
 
Library and Other Resources Print E-mail

Reprints, bibilography, translations, reviews, reprints, links and more.

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Monitor Lizards by Mampam Conservation Print E-mail

Monitor lizards (Varanus species) include the largest lizards in the world and are of considerable ecomonic value in some of the poorest countries in the world. There are many unresolved and serious conservation and welfare issues connected with the trade in monitor lizards.

 

Click here for the Monitor Lizard site 

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Water Monitor Print E-mail
The first two articles in this occasional series on the monitor lizards of Asia discussed two rare and enigmatic animals found only in rainforests and mangrove swamps. Virtually nothing is known of their biology and they are only rarely seen in captivity, at least on this side of the Atlantic (Bennett 1993, 1995).
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Dumeril's Monitor Print E-mail
ImageDumeril's monitor is a large lizard from southeast Asia about which very little is known. Until a few years ago they were not uncommon in the pet trade in Europe and the U.S.A. but breeding success with the species was very limited and today they rarely appear on dealers' lists.
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The History of Monitor Lizards Print E-mail

 

As the monitors spread across the Earth experiencing different habitats and climates they diversified. Over many millions of years this process has resulted in the emergence of at least seventy or eighty (probably many thousands of) species. Some of them appeared to have died out quickly, whilst other, apparently ancient, species have survived until the present.

 

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Megalania prisca by Iain Curran, 1995

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Monitors and Mankind Print E-mail
ImageOur relationship with monitor lizards stretches back over 90,000,000 years. For almost all of this time they have been the predators and we the prey. The first documented cases of predation on monitor lizards by humans date back about 40,000 years (King 1962). Today mankind's relationship with the monitors  is a complex one. They are undoubtedly the most important of the lizards to the human race.
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How long do Monitors live? Print E-mail
ImageThere are very few records of the longevity of monitor lizards in captivity (Flower 1925, 1937, Snider & Bowler 1992, Bennett 1994) and virtually none of their lifespan in the wild. The record appears to be held by the Taronga Zoo in Sydney, where a Komodo dragon was kept for 24.5 years. The animal was adult when acquired, and a total lifespan of about 50 years has been predicted for this species (Auffenberg 1981).
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News from Mampam Conservation

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The mampam website has been running for 16 years and aims to provide full details of projects at no charge. All out of print books and multimedia guides are provided here and full image archives are being developed for each project. This will complete the website's mission.

 

 
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The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Foraging behaviour

butaan7.jpgWe use feces to investigate diet and activity areas of butaan. In total we have examined more than 1500 samples, possibly the largest ever collected for a single population of reptiles.  Butaan and their relatives are huge specialised frugivores, much bigger than any other specialised frugivorous animal in  the Philippines. They need a constant supply of fruit but lack the wings that allow other frugivores to forage in different forest fragments. Large and immobile, the butaan depends on a very narrow range of foods.

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